Title

Culture and the Structure of Personal Experience: Insider and Outsider Phenomenologies of the Self and Social World

Publication Type

Book Chapter

Publication Date

1-2007

Abstract

This chapter argues for the importance of understanding the role of culture in structuring people's personal phenomenological experience. Such an understanding is (1) important per se and (2) important for elucidating the feedback loops between culture and self, between macro‐level ideology and micro‐level experience. To illustrate, we contrast the “outsider” perspective on the self of Asian‐Americans with the “insider” perspective on the world for Euro‐Americans. We examine (1) the outsider versus insider perspective by looking at the phenomenology of memory imagery, online imagery, visualization and embodiment of narratives, and relational versus egocentric projection; (2) the implications for cultural differences in egocentric biases that derive from dwelling too much in one's own internal experience; and (3) the emergence of developmental differences in characterizing the social world. We argue that the lessons of experience and cultural ideology cocreate each other, and we illustrate this by describing some ways that distinct phenomenological experiences are intimately tied to cultural norms, beliefs, and ideals.

Keywords

personal phenomenological experience, culture, outsider, insider

Discipline

Social Psychology

Research Areas

Psychology

Publication

Advances in Experimental Social Psychology

Volume

39

Editor

Mark P. Zanna

First Page

1

Last Page

67

ISBN

9780080493190

Identifier

10.1016/S0065-2601(06)39001-6

Publisher

Elsevier

City or Country

Amsterdam

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Additional URL

http://doi.org/10.1016/S0065-2601(06)39001-6

Comments

Edited by Mark P. Zanna