Title

Implicit Theories and Conceptions of Morality

Publication Type

Journal Article

Publication Date

11-1997

Abstract

In this article, the authors propose that individuals' moral beliefs are linked to their implicit theories about the nature (i.e., malleability) of their social-moral reality. Specifically, it was hypothesized that when individuals believe in a fixed reality (entity theory), they tend to hold moral beliefs in which duties within the given system are seen as fundamental. In contrast, when individuals believe in a malleable reality (incremental theory), one that can be shaped by individuals, they hold moral beliefs that focus on moral principles, such as human rights, around which that reality should be organized. Results from 5 studies supported the proposed framework: Implicit theories about the malleability of one's social-moral reality predicted duty-based vs. rights-based moral beliefs.

Keywords

fixed vs individually malleable reality beliefs & social morality, adults (mean age 19.86 yrs)

Discipline

Personality and Social Contexts | Social Psychology

Research Areas

Psychology

Publication

Journal of Personality and Social Psychology

Volume

73

Issue

5

First Page

923

Last Page

940

ISSN

0022-3514

Identifier

10.1037/0022-3514.73.5.923

Publisher

American Psychological Association

Additional URL

http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/0022-3514.73.5.923

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