Publication Type

Journal Article

Publication Date

1-2018

Abstract

Socioeconomic status (SES) and bilingualism have been shown to influence executive functioning during earlychildhood. Less is known, however, about how the two factors interact within an individual. By analyzing anationally representative sample of approximately 18,200 children who were tracked from ages 5 to 7 acrossfour waves, both higher SES and bilingualism were found to account for greater performance on the inhibitionand shifting aspects of executive functions (EF) and self-regulatory behaviors in classroom. However, onlySES reliably predicted verbal working memory. Furthermore, bilingualism moderated the effects of SES byameliorating the detrimental consequences of low-SES on EF and self-regulatory behaviors. These findingsunderscore bilingualism’s power to enrich executive functioning and self-regulatory behaviors, especiallyamong underprivileged children.

Discipline

Bilingual, Multilingual, and Multicultural Education | Child Psychology

Research Areas

Psychology

Publication

Child Development

First Page

1

Last Page

21

ISSN

0009-3920

Identifier

10.1111/cdev.13032

Publisher

Wiley: 12 months

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Additional URL

https://doi.org/10.1111/cdev.13032

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