Publication Type

Book Review

Version

Postprint

Publication Date

1-2002

Abstract

This largely descriptive book sets out three questions of interest to international relations scholars and policy-makers: What is global civil society? What are its origins? And what are the roles of individuals in creating and maintaining it? After a brief literature review, the book provides a definition: global civil society is 'a socially constructed and transnationally defined network of relationships that provides ideologically variable channels of opportunity for political involvement' (p. 19). This definition reflects the book's grounding in 'people-centered' International Relations theory, drawing on the English school of Wight and Bull and paralleling the American constructivist paradigm to focus on agency as well as structure. It then examines eight Northern non-governmental organizations (NGOs) as exemplars of how global civil society is creating itself with heavy reliance on the Internet. All are progressive advocacy organizations: three environmental, three development-focused, and two 'online resource networks' that attempt to serve the communications and information needs of large NGO networks.

Discipline

Political Science

Research Areas

Political Science

Publication

International Affairs

Volume

78

Issue

1

First Page

168

Last Page

168

ISSN

0020-5850

Embargo Period

2-21-2018

Copyright Owner and License

Author

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Additional URL

http://www.jstor.org/stable/3096001

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