Publication Type

Journal Article

Publication Date

6-2012

Abstract

Existing religious economy models maintain that as religious regulation increases, levels of interreligious competition decrease. But new understandings of the market dynamics of religious oligopolies necessitate new understandings of religious competitiveness. A relational model of competitiveness using the case of evangelical Christianity in Buddhist-majority Sri Lanka is proposed. In Sri Lanka the informal religious economy is defined by competitiveness among evangelical Christian groups and, although not recognized by the state, is closely regulated. The focus in this article is on the scalar determinations of evangelical competitiveness, patterns of secrecy and subterfuge, the formation of strategic extra-group networks that enable competitiveness, and outcomes of a relational model. Three insights are offered that can be used as a starting point for further work on religious oligopolies, informal economies, and relational understandings of religious competition.

Keywords

oligopoly, religious economy, religious competition, informal economy, evangelical Christianity, Sri Lanka

Discipline

Asian Studies | Religion

Research Areas

Humanities

Publication

Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion

Volume

51

Issue

2

First Page

203

Last Page

219

ISSN

0021-8294

Identifier

10.1111/j.1468-5906.2012.01642.x

Publisher

Wiley: 24 months

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Additional URL

https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-5906.2012.01642.x

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