Publication Type

Journal Article

Publication Date

7-2011

Abstract

This essay examines whether developing countries with competitive multiparty democracies may be just as capable of sustaining rapid economic growth as single-party states. It begins with a literature review identifying political stability and the ability to mobilize labor and capital production inputs as key factors behind sustained rapid growth. It then develops the hypothesis that under certain conditions, multiparty democracies may be strong in these dimensions, but ceteris paribus, single-party states are likely to have an advantage. I test this hypothesis by exploring historical trends in rapid growth over the last five decades. Statistical regression analysis confirms that most sustained high-growth regimes have not been competitive multiparty democracies. On a more optimistic note, however, the number of high-growth multiparty democracies increased significantly during the period between 2000 and 2009, signaling a possible breakthrough in the twenty-first century.

Keywords

authoritarianism, democracy, economic growth, political regimes, single party states, political stability, developing countries

Discipline

Economic Policy | Political Science

Research Areas

Political Science

Publication

Taiwan Journal of Democracy

Volume

7

Issue

1

First Page

25

Last Page

46

ISSN

1815-7238

Publisher

Taiwan Foundation for Democracy

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

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