Title

Navigating through the ‘rules’ of civil society: In search of disability rights in Singapore

Publication Type

Book Chapter

Publication Date

1-2017

Abstract

The Singapore School, initiated by the founding Prime Minister Lee Kuan Yew and subsequently propagated by Bilahari Kausikan and Kishore Mahbubani, characterises a political regime dedicated to social order and economic growth that is believed to achieve human dignity and “good governance” (Chew 1994). In this vein, the needs and rights of the community may outweigh the rights of the individual in the eyes of the government. Political and social goals, such as reducing inequality for persons with disabilities, have not been a major policy in Singapore’s history (Ng 2015). Rather, economic development and nation building have been the key emphases in providing access to education, housing and healthcare. Given Singapore’s economic disadvantage compounded with high unemployment rates, poverty and inadequate public housing, the priority of social welfare policy was not to place further financial burden on the state (Low and Aw 2004). These principles continue to shape social policies in Singapore. Lee expressed the hope that Singapore would never become a Western-style, liberal, individualistic society such as the USA or the UK.

Discipline

Asian Studies | Family, Life Course, and Society

Publication

A history of human rights society in Singapore: 1965-2015

Editor

Song Jiyoung

First Page

169

Last Page

186

ISBN

9781138694729

Identifier

10.4324/9781315527413

Publisher

Taylor and Francis

City or Country

London

Additional URL

http://doi.org/10.4324/9781315527413

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