Title

Who does what?: Collective action and the changing nature of authority

Publication Type

Book Chapter

Publication Date

1-2000

Abstract

With a little translation into the appropriate theoretical terms, the debate over the form of the emergent world order boils down to disagreements over which collectivities will provide which collective goods to whom. Huntington’s (1996) clash-of-civilisations thesis contends that civilisations, rather than states, will provide such collective goods as defence (from other civilisations) and cultural belonging. Kaplan’s (1996) prediction of The Coming Anarchy asserts that many collective goods will not be provided at all because poverty and environmental degradation will overwhelm the capacity of states to undertake collective action. Mathews’ (1997) Power Shift analysis argues that the information revolution has rendered a whole host of non-state actors increasingly capable of undertaking collective action and is thus undermining the power of the state.

Keywords

International relations, Foreign relations, Non-state actors, role of states

Discipline

Political Science | Public Affairs, Public Policy and Public Administration

Research Areas

Political Science

Publication

Non-state actors and authority in the global system

Editor

Richard A. Higgott, Geoffrey R. D. Underhill & Andreas Bieler

First Page

15

Last Page

31

ISBN

9780415220859

Publisher

Routledge

City or Country

London

Additional URL

http://worldcat.org/isbn/9780415220859

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS