Publication Type

Journal Article

Publication Date

3-2003

Abstract

These are, in many ways, halcyon days for global business. In a vast ideological shift in the late 20th century, markets rather than governments came to be seen as the road to prosperity. Governments that once nationalized foreign firms now seek out the investment, technology, and managerial expertise such companies can bring. The halls of the United Nations used to ring with calls for international regulation of those dreaded evil-doers, the multinational corporations. Now the UN instead implores business to join with it in a voluntary Global Compact to ensure respect for internationally agreed environmental, labor, and human rights standards.

Keywords

Business ethics, Communication and technology, Transportation, Globalization

Discipline

Business Law, Public Responsibility, and Ethics | Political Science

Research Areas

Political Science

Publication

Brookings Review

Volume

21

Issue

2

First Page

4

Last Page

8

ISSN

0745-1253

Copyright Owner and License

Author

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Comments

Reprinted in Opposing Viewpoints Series: Corporate Social Responsibility (US: Greenhaven Press, 2009).

Share

COinS