Publication Type

Journal Article

Publication Date

9-2011

Abstract

Wherever government ministers and international bureaucrats gather to debate and shape the global economy, hordes of protesters converge. And now some of the groups involved in the coordinated protests plan to diversify their targets to include multinational corporations. The protests themselves are merely the visible tip of a vast iceberg of transnational networks tying together people from all parts of the world who share grievances about the current rules governing global economic integration. Transnational civil society networks should not and will not end up making the rules themselves: the final decisions must rest with governments. But the protest movement has become too large to ignore, and it will not go away. Unless international organizations and corporations wish to relocate to Antarctica, they will have to seek out ways to grant a meaningful voice to these groups.

Keywords

Trade Negotiation, Globalization, Demonstrations and Protests, Social Policy, Citizenship

Discipline

Political Science | Public Affairs, Public Policy and Public Administration

Research Areas

Political Science

Publication

OECD Observer

Issue

228

First Page

33

Last Page

34

ISSN

1561-5529

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

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