Title

Civil religion and the invention of traditions: Constructing 'the Singapore nation'

Publication Type

Journal Article

Publication Date

1-2007

Abstract

In this article, I adopt the concept of civil religion, and particularly those aspects that emphasize the importance of rituals and traditions in the construction of a ‘nation’, to examine the ways in which a particular nation—Singapore—is politically and socially constructed. Using two specific examples of invented rituals and traditions, I illustrate the ways in which the state attempts to build a sense of community and identity. The two examples I use are an annual choreography of spectacle and display to celebrate Singapore’s National Day, and the production of a tapestry currently on exhibition as a very public symbol of community and belonging.

Discipline

Asian Studies | Religion | Sociology of Culture

Research Areas

Humanities

Publication

Australian Religious Studies Review

Volume

20

Issue

1

First Page

77

Last Page

93

Identifier

10.1558/arsr.v20i1.77

Additional URL

http://doi.org/10.1558/arsr.v20i1.77

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