Title

Where is the stork? Sociological insights into barriers to fertility in Singapore1

Publication Type

Book Chapter

Publication Date

1-2006

Abstract

Low fertility has become a global phenomenon in developed economies, with low birth rates and shrinking populations threatening the projected labour supply of the future. The next generation of parents-to-be grew up in conditions that were governed by change in the ideologies of family, parenthood, children, and work. Singapore is experiencing its lowest fertility rate since gaining independence in 1965. The total fertility rate (TFR) reached replacement level in 1975 and has been declining ever since, largely because of declining marriage rates. This chapter presents the findings from the focus groups interviews. The ideal model of parenting that was articulated by the respondents requires the personal attention of at least one biological parent in terms of child-minding and nurturing. The chapter highlights the ideological barriers that young Singaporean adults face in deciding whether to enter into parenthood.

Keywords

focus groups interviews, marriage rates, parenthood, Singapore, total fertility rate (TFR)

Discipline

Asian Studies | Family, Life Course, and Society

Research Areas

Sociology

Publication

Sociology for change: Social Transformations in Chinese Societies

Volume

2

Editor

Bian Yan-Jie; Chan Kwok-Bun; Tak-Sing Cheung

First Page

143

Last Page

162

ISBN

9789004157064

Identifier

10.1163/ej.9789004157064.i-245.58

Publisher

Brill

City or Country

Leiden

Additional URL

https://doi.org/10.1163/ej.9789004157064.i-245.58

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