Publication Type

Journal Article

Publication Date

6-2003

Abstract

Health care social policy in Singapore has passed the burden of care to the individual and the family on the rationale that it would enable the state to contain the costs of long-term care by channelling some of its funds to community services and to providing essential health services to all Singaporeans and not just the older group. While a wide array of services has come into existence, there is a lack of integration between the available resources and needs of the individual/family and what has been availed at the community and state levels. Part of the problem lies in the stringent criteria to which the state allows subsidies to be used; the lack of understanding with regard to the profile of users of services; and the case manager approach in offering services. Mapping health care has proven more difficult than anticipated because ageing is a diverse experience, varying by gender, race, income, religion and intergenerational relationships. A social policy does not apply to a 'universal citizen' and services that exist in the public sphere should not exist as merely commodified services which require a great deal of institutional processing. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

Keywords

residualisation, individual responsibility, community services, private and public spheres

Discipline

Asian Studies | Civic and Community Engagement

Research Areas

Sociology

Publication

Health Policy

Volume

64

Issue

3

First Page

399

Last Page

413

ISSN

0168-8510

Identifier

10.1016/S0168-8510(02)00201-4

Publisher

Elsevier

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Additional URL

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/10761885_Providing_Health_Care_for_Older_Persons_in_Singapore

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