Publication Type

Journal Article

Publication Date

4-2017

Abstract

Policy reforms are difficult for developing states, especially when they are meant to improve cooperation and collaboration between private citizens and state officials, such as in the case of education, health care provision, business-state relations, and policing. A large part of this challenge is that the policy reforms required for coproduction of services necessitate development of state capacity in new directions. Using the substantive issue of irrigation reforms, especially those aimed at improving service provision and farmer participation, I identify three lessons for reformers regarding the implementation of policy for the coproduction of services. Drawing on extensive fieldwork in Thailand and Indonesia, as well as the experience of the National Irrigation Administration in the Philippines, I emphasize the importance of street-level bureaucrats. The lessons drawn from irrigation policy are comparable to other practice-intensive state activities.

Discipline

Models and Methods | Political Science

Research Areas

Political Science

Publication

Asian Politics and Policy

Volume

9

Issue

2

First Page

310

Last Page

319

ISSN

1943-0779

Identifier

10.1111/aspp.12319

Publisher

Wiley: 24 months

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Additional URL

http://doi.org./10.1111/aspp.12319

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