Publication Type

Blog Post

Version

Postprint

Publication Date

4-2016

Abstract

At first blush, contemporary China seems ripe for the rapid development of agricultural cooperatives. After all, cooperatives have not only enjoyed a long history in China, but the country’s recent experience with agricultural communes should make it more amenable to the reestablishment of joint production and spontaneous bottom-up cooperation. Agricultural cooperatives in China date to the 1930s, as Rural Reconstruction Movement advocates promoted cooperatives as a “third road” between capitalism and socialism. Although Mao’s regime disbanded most bottom-up cooperatives, rural cooperatives began to reemerge in rural China by the end of the 20th century, particularly after 1998, when farmer cooperatives at the grassroots level began increasing markedly in number (Jia, Huang & Xu, 2012). Since the 1990s, agricultural cooperatives — particularly Farmers’ Specialized Cooperatives (FSCs) — have been reinvigorated and experienced rapid expansion in rural China.

Discipline

Agribusiness | Asian Studies | Political Science | Rural Sociology

Research Areas

Political Science; Sociology

Publication

International Public Policy Review

First Page

1

Last Page

4

Copyright Owner and License

Authors

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Additional URL

http://ippreview.com/index.php/Blog/single/id/96.html

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