Publication Type

Journal Article

Publication Date

1-2016

Abstract

Group members often over-weigh shared information and under-value unique information during discussions to the detriment of decision quality. Fortunately, perceiving other group members as receptive to dissenting opinions may enhance information sharing. We distinguish between two ways of expressing opinion-differences about tasks-debates and disagreements-that we predict are perceived by others as conveying varying degrees of receptivity to dissenting opinions. In four studies with mixed methods and a causal chain design, we manipulate and measure group members' (the "senders") expressions of debates and disagreements, others' (the "receivers") perceptions of the senders' receptivity to dissenting opinions, and receivers' information sharing intentions and behavior. We demonstrate that task conflicts that are expressed as debates rather than as disagreements are associated with greater information sharing because receivers perceive senders to be more receptive to dissenting opinions. We, thus, offer a novel approach to increasing information utilization during group decision making and help resolve the paradoxical effects of opinion differences on group performance.

Keywords

task conflict, debate, disagreement, perceived receptivity to dissenting opinions, information sharing, group performance

Discipline

Industrial and Organizational Psychology

Research Areas

Psychology

Publication

Organization Science

Volume

27

Issue

1

First Page

141

Last Page

156

ISSN

1047-7039

Identifier

10.1287/orsc.2015.1025

Publisher

INFORMS (Institute for Operations Research and Management Sciences)

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Additional URL

http://doi.org/10.1287/orsc.2015.1025

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