Publication Type

Journal Article

Publication Date

1-2017

Abstract

Existing accounts of how the urban poor in the global south engage with the state fall short on two fronts. Firstly, the literature lacks an overarching framework articulating the urban poor’s strategies for engaging the state. Secondly, these accounts typically capture singular instances of state engagement pursued by the urban poor and theorise on that basis. Using Partha Chatterjee’s distinction between civil and political society as our theoretical point of departure, we draw on ethnographic evidence from Chennai’s informal settlements to demonstrate how and when the urban poor deploy different strategies of state engagement to advance their claims to urban citizenship. We do this by proposing a typology that relates the seemingly distinct strategies of claims making for urban citizenship to each other, and identifying a trajectory of change for strategies deployed in the Indian metropolis of Chennai.

Keywords

Chennai, Citizenship, informality, slum, urban

Discipline

Asian Studies | Public Affairs, Public Policy and Public Administration | Sociology | Urban Studies

Research Areas

Sociology

Publication

International Development Planning Review

Volume

39

Issue

1

First Page

77

Last Page

95

ISSN

1474-6743

Identifier

10.3828/idpr.2017.5

Publisher

Liverpool University Press

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Additional URL

http://doi.org/10.3828/idpr.2017.5

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