Title

What Do We Learn from the Implicit Association Test about Intergroup Attitudes in Hong Kong? The Case of Social Identification Inclusiveness and Need for Closure

Publication Type

Journal Article

Publication Date

8-2007

Abstract

The current study tests an implication of the Associative-Propositional Evaluation model of implicit and explicit attitude measures in Hong Kong's intergroup context. We argued that the Implicit Association Test taps associative intergroup evaluations that are not necessarily consistent with the propositional implications of one's social identification inclusiveness and need for closure. In contrast, explicit intergroup attitude measures tap propositional evaluations resulting from validating the inferences drawn from pertinent propositional information in the evaluation context. Thus, explicit intergroup attitude should be consistent with the propositional implications of social identification inclusiveness and need for closure. We tested and found support for these hypotheses in a study of Hong Kong adolescents' ( N = 65) perception of Hong Kong people and Mainland Chinese.

Keywords

Hong Kong, social inclusiveness, intergroup attitudes, social identification

Discipline

Asian Studies | Social Psychology

Research Areas

Psychology

Publication

Asian Journal of Social Psychology

Volume

10

Issue

3

First Page

123

Last Page

130

ISSN

1367-2223

Identifier

10.1111/j.1467-839X.2007.00219.x

Publisher

Wiley

Additional URL

http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-839X.2007.00219.x

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