Title

Can Authoritarianism Lead to Greater Liking of Out-Groups? The Intriguing Case of Singapore

Publication Type

Journal Article

Publication Date

12-2015

Abstract

Authoritarianism refers to the individual’s willingness to submit to authorities that are perceived as established and legitimate and to conform to social norms and traditions endorsed by society at large, as well as a general aggressiveness toward groups that deviate from the modal norm (Altemeyer, 1981). Since the publication of The Authoritarian Personality, the seminal work by Adorno, Frenkel-Brunswik, Levinson, and Sanford (1950), numerous empirical studies have consistently demonstrated the seemingly inextricable link between authoritarianism and negative attitudes about out-groups (for a meta-analysis, see Sibley & Duckitt, 2008). Indeed, in the authoritarian mind, minorities are readily perceived as “bad, disruptive, immoral, and deviant” people who do not fit into society (Duckitt, 2001, p. 85).

Discipline

Personality and Social Contexts | Psychology | Social Psychology

Research Areas

Psychology

Publication

Psychological Science

Volume

26

Issue

12

First Page

1972

Last Page

1974

ISSN

0956-7976

Identifier

10.1177/0956797615605271

Publisher

Association for Psychological Science

Additional URL

http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0956797615605271