Publication Type

Journal Article

Publication Date

1-2016

Abstract

States are increasingly striving to create participatory local organizations for joint management of common pool resources. What local conditions determine success of such state efforts? What effect do these efforts have? Drawing on controlled comparisons between three districts in Indonesia and an original survey of 92 water user groups, I demonstrate that local political contexts condition the effectiveness of participatory irrigation policies. When irrigation is politically salient, local politicians pressure bureaucrats to better engage with farmers. The data also show that training programs are not as effective at increasing water user organization activity as frequent contact between bureaucrats and farmers.

Keywords

common pool resources, participatory management, local government, irrigation, Southeast Asia, Indonesia

Discipline

Asian Studies | Environmental Policy | Urban Studies and Planning

Research Areas

Humanities

Publication

World Development

Volume

77

First Page

34

Last Page

47

ISSN

0305-750X

Identifier

10.1016/j.worlddev.2015.08.014

Publisher

Elsevier

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Additional URL

http://doi.org/10.1016/j.worlddev.2015.08.014

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