Publication Type

Journal Article

Publication Date

3-1997

Abstract

In this paper, we adopt the view that 'nation' and 'national identity' are social constructions, created to serve ideological ends. We discuss this in the specific empirical context of Singapore's National Day parades. By drawing on officially produced souvenir programmes and magazines, newspaper reports, and interviews with participants and spectators, we analyse the parades between 1965 and 1994, showing how, as an annual ritual and landscape spectacle, the parades succeed to a large extent in creating a sense of awe, wonderment and admiration. Discussion focuses on four aspects of the celebrations: the site of the parades, their display and theatricality, the composition and involvement of parade participants, and parade themes. We also discuss some examples of alternative readings of parade meanings, illustrating how ideological hegemony is not total.

Keywords

National Day, parades, Singapore, national identity

Discipline

Asian Studies | Human Geography | Social Influence and Political Communication | Sociology of Culture

Research Areas

Humanities

Publication

Political Geography

Volume

16

Issue

3

First Page

213

Last Page

239

ISSN

0962-6298

Identifier

10.1016/0962-6298(95)00135-2

Publisher

Elsevier

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Additional URL

http://doi.org/10.1016/0962-6298(95)00135-2