Publication Type

Journal Article

Publication Date

8-2002

Abstract

This paper focuses on one category of the 'unofficially sacred'-namely, those secular spaces which are used for worship and, in particular, residential spaces which are turned into 'house churches'. Using the case study of a house church in Singapore, the paper examines issues about the politics of religion in urban landscapes in a secular and simultaneously multireligious state. Contrary and in addition to current wisdoms about the politics of religious space, it is argued that various politics are observed: a politics of inclusion; a politics of hybridisation and in-betweenness; a politics of appropriation and nationalisation; and a politics of impermanence and precarity. Through this analysis, the paper seeks to bring added conceptual perspectives to the notion of 'sacred space' within the context of modern, urban, secular settings.

Keywords

cultural landscape, political process, public space, religion, urban politics, land use, Singapore

Discipline

Asian Studies | Religion | Urban Studies

Research Areas

Humanities

Publication

Urban Studies

Volume

39

Issue

9

First Page

1573

Last Page

1586

ISSN

0042-0980

Identifier

10.1080/00420980220151664

Publisher

SAGE

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Additional URL

http://doi.org/10.1080/00420980220151664

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