Publication Type

Journal Article

Publication Date

8-2005

Abstract

This paper examines the roles that museums play as 'unofficially sacred' places, underscoring or challenging the religious life of a people and 'nation'. It focuses on three key questions: (1) Do sub-national and transnational religious formations pose a challenge to or present opportunities for nation-building strategies, and what part do museums play in this struggle? (2) In what ways do re-presentations of religion in museums contest or reinforce religious community and identity? and (3) What challenges do museum displays pose to the understanding of religious meanings? This paper explores these three key questions about the intersection of religion with politics and ideologies, social relations, and cultural interpretations and transformations using an in-depth case study of an exhibition on the Jewish community in Singapore.

Keywords

religion, nation, community, identity, museums, Jews, Singapore

Discipline

Asian Studies | Human Geography | Race and Ethnicity

Research Areas

Humanities

Publication

Social and Cultural Geography

Volume

6

Issue

4

First Page

495

Last Page

513

ISSN

1464-9365

Identifier

10.1080/14649360500200213

Publisher

Taylor & Francis

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Additional URL

http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14649360500200213

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