Publication Type

Journal Article

Publication Date

6-2014

Abstract

Past research has shown that exposure to cultural symbols can influence personal preferences. The present research extends this finding by showing that cultural symbols acquire their cultural significance in part through their associations with intersubjectively important values—values that are perceived to be prevalent in the culture. In addition, cultural symbols can influence personal preferences through the activation of perceived normative preferences. In Study 1, perceived liking of Bush among Americans was linked to the perceived popularity of intersubjectively important values in the USA. In Study 2, both priming Bush and personal endorsement of intersubjectively important values increased Americans' liking of iconic brands (brands that symbolize American culture). Furthermore, perceived normative preferences for iconic brands fully mediated this effect.

Keywords

Cultural influence, American presidents, Intersubjective culture, Brand evaluation, Cultural fit

Discipline

Multicultural Psychology | Social Psychology

Research Areas

Psychology

Publication

Social Influence

Volume

9

Issue

3

First Page

206

Last Page

223

ISSN

1553-4510

Identifier

10.1080/15534510.2013.811441

Publisher

Taylor and Francis

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Additional URL

http://doi.org/10.1080/15534510.2013.811441

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