Publication Type

Journal Article

Publication Date

2-2014

Abstract

What allowed eight siblings from a politically disadvantaged rural family to overcome institutional barriers and achieve upward mobility during Maoist China? What then restricted their children’s chances of upward mobility during the Reform era, when both family background and institutional environment were more favourable? In studying this anomalous case, whose experiences contradicted the well-documented effects of state policies and yet cannot be explained by parental influence, this study examines how adult siblings influenced each other’s status attainment processes, an issue largely neglected in the literature. Through comparing the micro-level mobility processes of the two generations in this family, I propose that, in times of rapid social change, sibling influence is more effective in generating status gain than parental influence, because the extensivity of sibling ties allows people to mobilize more relevant and heterogeneous social resources to facilitate social mobility.

Keywords

China, intergenerational mobility, sibling relations, social resources, status attainment, strong ties

Discipline

Asian Studies | Family, Life Course, and Society

Research Areas

Sociology

Publication

Sociology

Volume

48

Issue

1

First Page

75

Last Page

91

ISSN

0038-0385

Identifier

10.1177/0038038512466971

Publisher

SAGE

Copyright Owner and License

Author

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Additional URL

http://doi.org/10.1177/0038038512466971

Share

COinS