Publication Type

Journal Article

Publication Date

2012

Abstract

How did family characteristics affect women and men differently in self-employment participation in urban China? Analyses of national data show dual marriage penalties for women. Marketization made married women more vulnerable to lay-offs from state-sector jobs; their likelihood of being pushed into unskilled self-employment surpassed that of any other groups. The revitalized patriarchal family tradition favored men in family businesses and resulted in their higher rates of entering entrepreneurial self-employment. Married women who had the education to pursue entrepreneurial self-employment were constrained by family responsibilities to state-sector jobs for access to family services, and had much lower rates in entering self-employment.

Keywords

self-employment, family, job mobility, gender segregation, Asia, China

Discipline

Asian Studies | Family, Life Course, and Society | Gender and Sexuality

Research Areas

Sociology

Publication

World Development

Volume

40

Issue

6

First Page

1201

Last Page

1212

ISSN

0305-750X

Identifier

10.1016/j.worlddev.2011.11.004

Publisher

Elsevier

Copyright Owner and License

Authors

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Additional URL

http://doi.org/10.1016/j.worlddev.2011.11.004

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