Publication Type

Journal Article

Publication Date

12-2007

Abstract

The maintenance of a “moderate mainstream” Muslim community as a bulwark against the fraying of harmonious ethnic relations has become a key governance concern post-September 11. In light of the global concern—and often paranoia—with diasporic Islam, Islamic religious institutions and civil society have been portrayed in the popular media as hotbeds of radicalism, promoters of hatred, and recruiters for a “conflict of civilization” between the Muslim world and the modern world. Having declared itself a terrorist's “iconic target,” Singapore has taken a broad-based community approach in advancing inter-religious tolerance, including a subtle initiative to include the “Muslim civil society” in advancing the understanding and the promotion of a moderate brand of Islam in Singapore. This tacit process of regulation (top-down, intra-community and inter-community), while effective, is constrained by the unique governance context in Singapore.

Keywords

civil society, Islam, religion, Singapore, terrorism

Discipline

Asian Studies | Public Law and Legal Theory | Public Policy | Religion Law

Research Areas

Law, Society and Governance

Publication

Terrorism and Political Violence

Volume

19

Issue

4

First Page

443

Last Page

462

ISSN

0954-6553

Identifier

10.1080/09546550701590610

Publisher

Taylor and Francis

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Additional URL

https://doi.org/10.1080/09546550701590610

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