Title

Teaching comparative law in Singapore: Global and local challenges

Publication Type

Book Chapter

Publication Date

12-2017

Abstract

In the 21st century it has become impossible for law schools across the globe to ignore two important, and interrelated, contemporary trends in the law. The first is that law no longer necessarily stops, as it used to, at national borders: many countries contemplate, for example, the extra-territorial application of their regimes governing areas such as competition, corruption or the environment. The second is that legal practice is becoming increasingly globalised as a result of a growing incidence of cross-border transactions, capital flows and migration. It is clear that an overwhelming majority of law schools have been compelled to re-examine their curriculum in light of the new and tight embrace between law and global processes, with a View to preparing their graduates for a world of law that looks increasingly and radically different from the one in which most of their teachers were themselves educated.In the case of Singapore, this logic of legal globalisation is even more compelling than it might be elsewhere. As a small city-state of less than six million people with no natural resources, and a developed, highly sophisticated, service-driven economy, Singapore is already highly integrated with the rest of Asia and the global economy. It has extensive economic, cultural, and even familial links to most of the surrounding ASEAN countries (especially Malaysia), which themselves are integrating rapidly, and farther afield to China, India, North-East Asia, and other parts of the world. This state of affairs reflects, to a considerable extent, a deliberate policy choice: Singapore has the ambition to be - and already is in many ways — a legal hub for Asia, with expanding arbitration work,1 and now an international commercial court populated by international judges drawn from foreign common and civil law

Discipline

Comparative and Foreign Law

Publication

Legal education in Asia: From imitation to innovation

Volume

6

Editor

Andrew Harding; Jiaxiang Hu; Maartje De Visser

First Page

102

Last Page

124

Identifier

10.1163/9789004349698

Publisher

Brill

City or Country

Leiden

Additional URL

https://doi.org/10.1163/9789004349698

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS