Publication Type

Journal Article

Publication Date

11-2013

Abstract

Does Singapore's approach to institutional design vis-avis political representation prioritize strong and effective government, or is the goal one that is geared towards a representative government as a means of enhancing political governance? his paper examines the series of amendments to Singapore's Constitution and related legislation, between 1984 and 1990, and in 2010, which relate to political representation in Singapore's electoral system and unicameral legislature. At one level, the changes are part of the endeavor to retain Parliament's standing as the focal point of Singapore's Westminstermodeled system of government. The constitutional changes reflect the political elites' abiding belief that institutional design must produce a government with a clear mandate, demonstrated through a strong parliamentary majority, for it to govern resolutely and decisively in the long-term interests of Singapore. However, even as the changes are presented as a public interest endeavor to enhance Parliament's representativeness, the legislative changes marginalize the importance of representation in Singapore's parliamentary democracy.

Keywords

Legislatures, Singapore, Political Representation, Institutional Design, Parliamentary Elections

Discipline

Asian Studies | Constitutional Law

Publication

Yonsei Law Journal

Volume

4

Issue

2

First Page

274

Last Page

308

ISSN

2093-3754

Publisher

Yonsei Law School, Institute for Legal Studies

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

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