Publication Type

Book Chapter

Version

Postprint

Publication Date

1-2014

Abstract

The Trans-Pacific Strategic Economic Partnership Agreement is also known as the Pacific-4, or the P4 Agreement as it started out as a free trade agreement between 4 Pacific countries, i.e., Brunei, Chile, New Zealand and Singapore. The history of economic integration among the P4 members can be traced back to the 1990s, when Chile and New Zealand first started exploring the possibility for an FTA. While the bilateral talks were suspended after only two rounds of negotiations due to Chile’s concerns on the potential impact on its agricultural sector, the idea re-emerged in 2000, shortly after New Zealand and Singapore announced the negotiation of an FTA. This time it took the form of a trilateral Closer Economic Partnership (CEP) involving all three countries. Originally conceptualized as the “Pacific Three” (P3) Agreement, its proponents also hoped that the Agreement could pave the way for wider trade liberalization in the APEC region that would lead to a P5 scheme, i.e., Australia and the US in addition to the original three countries.

Keywords

Regionalism, Free trade, Commercial policy, China, Asia

Discipline

Antitrust and Trade Regulation | International Trade Law

Research Areas

Public International Law, Regional and Trade Law

Publication

Regional cooperation and free trade agreements in Asia

Editor

Jiaxing Hu & Matthias Vanhullebusch

First Page

77

Last Page

98

ISBN

9789004279858

Publisher

Brill

City or Country

Leiden

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Additional URL

https://worldcat.org/isbn/9789004279858

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