Publication Type

Journal Article

Publication Date

1-1984

Abstract

Despite the reality of partition that created "two Irelands," comparative analysis of the state's reactions to terrorism in the Province and in the Republic is rare. The struggle over reunification, which permeates society on both sides of the border, is usually viewed by the populist press not from the Irish viewpoint, but rather from the perspective of the British government. Given this bias, organized resistance -- most notably in the North of Ireland -- is represented as an assault on a majority-supported state. Because the legitimacy of the state under attack is rarely questioned, and the motivations for the resistance are over-simplified and misrepresented, the state's reaction to such terrorism escapes criticism, except in the most obvious instances.

Keywords

Criminal justice, Criminal offenses, Criminal courts, Terrorism, Rule of law, Legal evidence, Prisons, Criminal sanctions, Criminal law, Criminals, Ireland

Discipline

Criminal Law | Social Control, Law, Crime, and Deviance

Research Areas

Law, Society and Governance

Publication

Crime and Social Justice

Issue

21/22

First Page

95

Last Page

115

ISSN

2327-6398

Publisher

Berkeley, Calif

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Additional URL

http://www.jstor.org/stable/29766232

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