Publication Type

Journal Article

Version

Postprint

Publication Date

10-2012

Abstract

Stephen’s ground-breaking Indian Evidence Act contained ideas that appear unfamiliar in the context of modern rules of evidence. Singapore is an Indian Evidence Act jurisdiction which has retained those ideas, such as the non-distinction between relevance and admissibility, the framing of exclusionary rules in inclusionary terms, and the prohibition against relying on common law developments inconsistent with the Evidence Act. These peculiarities should have presented obstacles to the applicability of the common law concept of the judicial discretion to exclude relevant evidence, but this has not been the case. In this article, I first suggest why Singapore courts might have been attracted to the concept, but I then highlight fundamental uncertainties regarding the concept’s scope and normative justification. I proceed to propose an alternative paradigm for Singapore, namely using relevance and reliability as the only touchstones for admissibility of all evidence in criminal proceedings. The various advantages of this paradigm are also highlighted.

Discipline

Evidence

Research Areas

Law, Society and Governance

Publication

International Journal of Evidence and Proof

Volume

16

Issue

4

First Page

398

Last Page

424

ISSN

1365-7127

Identifier

10.1350/ijep.2012.16.4.413

Publisher

SAGE

Embargo Period

4-25-2017

Copyright Owner and License

Author

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Additional URL

http://doi.org/10.1350/ijep.2012.16.4.413

Included in

Evidence Commons

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