Title

The transplantation of western international law in Republican China

Publication Type

Book Chapter

Publication Date

11-2016

Abstract

This chapter analyzes the evolution of “Western” international law as an intellectual and professional discipline in Republican China. It argues that statism and pragmatism define the major features of the Republic of China’s approach to the reception of international law. These characteristics transformed the law of nations into universally valid normative claims and galvanized China’s intellectual focus from Westphalian sovereignty to the civilized nation concept. By examining the professionalization of international law in modern China, this chapter offers insight into the educational transplantation of the new discipline. The cultivation of China’s first-generation international lawyer contributed to the legal capacity of the Foreign Ministry. Chinese jurists’ participation in international law societies and the Shanghai Mixed Court further strengthened the nation’s legalist approach to diplomacy. Hence, this research provides a valuable case study of twentieth-century international lawmaking in Asia.

Keywords

China Law of nations, International law, Legal profession, Shanghai Mixed Court

Discipline

Asian Studies | Transnational Law

Research Areas

Law of Transnational Business

Publication

Legal Thoughts between the East and the West in the Multilevel Legal Order

Editor

Chang-fa Lo, Nigel N.T. Li, Tsai-yu Lin

First Page

239

Last Page

254

ISBN

978-981-10-1994-4

Identifier

10.1007/978-981-10-1995-1_15

Publisher

Springer

Additional URL

http://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-10-1995-1_15

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