Publication Type

Book Chapter

Publication Date

1-2009

Abstract

Setting someone up to fail does indeed sound unfair. In fact it could be described as an ambush – outlaw facilitators lying in wait for unsuspecting students. Not only is this unsettling in a training environment, we can ask whether this lack of transparency runs counter to the behavior expected of negotiators and mediators. Far from being a figment of our fertile imaginations, this short vignette is drawn from a real life learning situation at which both authors were present. Participants were asked at the beginning of the postgraduate workshop about their learning preferences. While most replied enthusiastically about learning in an interactive and experiential manner, one student voiced considerable fear about the use of role-plays. Her concerns were based on her past experiences in conflict resolution workshops.

Keywords

Negotiation, training, role-play

Discipline

Dispute Resolution and Arbitration | Higher Education | Legal Education

Research Areas

Dispute Resolution

Publication

Rethinking negotiation teaching: Innovations for context and culture

Editor

C. Honeyman; J. Coben; G. De Palo

First Page

179

Last Page

197

ISBN

9781441494771

Publisher

DRI Press

City or Country

St Paul, MN

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Additional URL

http://worldcat.org/isbn/9781441494771

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