Publication Type

Journal Article

Publication Date

1-2017

Abstract

Game-based constructivist learning has gained considerable attention as educational institutions aim to move from traditional instructional teaching to interactive and collaborative methods. The question is less asked of whether games should be used in teaching but rather how games should be used to create deep learning in students. In light of this movement, the Grade Inflation Game, or GIGAME, was developed. This case study tackles the research question of how games may be designed to harness the benefits of constructivist learning. It first documents the conceptualization of GIGAME and next proposes theoretical frameworks that can be used to guide the development and evaluation of constructivist learning games. Through trial runs on two undergraduate law of torts classes, feedback was gathered from students and the instructor of these classes regarding their perceptions of GIGAME, including learning effectiveness and satisfaction. The feedback suggests that GIGAME can serve as a form of game-based constructivist learning as most students indicated that the game helped consolidate their course knowledge while having fun. These qualitative findings are useful for guiding the development of other games that similarly aim to promote socially interactive and constructivist learning environments. This case study recommends the use of GIGAME in classes, although refinements can still be made to its gameplay.

Discipline

Art and Design | Educational Methods | Education Law

Research Areas

School of Law (SOL)

Publication

Research and Practice in Technology Enhanced Learning

Volume

12

Issue

7

First Page

1

Last Page

20

ISSN

1793-2068

Identifier

10.1186/s41039-016-0045-1

Publisher

World Scientific Publishing / SpringerOpen

Additional URL

http://doi.org./10.1186/s41039-016-0045-1

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