Publication Type

Journal Article

Publication Date

11-2015

Abstract

In this Article, I offer some considerations on a possible compromising solution for the controversy between the European Union (EU) and the United States (U.S.) on the regulation of geographical indications of origin (GIs) as part of the negotiations in the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP). Notably, I advocate that the EU and the U.S. consider adopting a solution similar to that adopted in the Canada and European Union Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA). In particular, I note that, even though CETA accepted several of the EU’s requests to claw-back names that were not previously protected in Canada, it also includes important exceptions to balance the effect of this claw-back process with respect to several (highly contested) names at issue. Thus, the solution adopted in CETA represents a win–win solution for Canada and the EU, and a similar solution could resolve the GI controversy in the TTIP. My position in this Article is that, far from being just an “EU thing,” an appropriate level of GI protection can promote local businesses, high(er) quality products, and more accurate consumer information about products everywhere, including in the U.S. Notably, a rigorous system of GI protection—-one that is based on products grown and manufactured locally and where geographical names are protected against misuse from parties operating outside the geographical areas—-would provide more accurate product information to U.S. consumers and could motivate U.S. producers to invest in and maintain high(er) quality local products. In turn, this could lead to more innovation in the U.S. food and agricultural sectors and higher quality products for U.S. consumers.

Discipline

Intellectual Property Law | International Trade Law | Law

Research Areas

Intellectual Property and Technology-related Law

Publication

Houston Law Review

Volume

53

Issue

2

First Page

373

Last Page

419

ISSN

0018-6694

Publisher

University of Houston College of Law

Copyright Owner and License

Author

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Additional URL

http://www.houstonlawreview.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/3-Calboli_Final.pdf

Comments

Symposium 2015

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