Publication Type

Journal Article

Version

Publisher’s Version

Publication Date

1-2015

Abstract

In the last few years, there has been a dramatic increase in the use of remote-controlled copters or “drones” by recreational users to capture aerial photographs and videos on an unprecedented scale. The convergence of cutting-edge technological developments in gyroscopic gimbals, long-range wireless transmissions, GPS-enabled stabilisation and flightpath-preprogramming, first-person-views, and compact digital imaging has led to the proliferation of these camera-carrying devices that even hobbyists can pilot with reasonable safety. However, there has been a consistent stream of public concern relating to issues of safety, privacy, and disruption of commercial interests. Lost in the paranoid cacophony is a question that warrants proper legislative reflection: how can these drones be regulated in a way that is proportionate and sensible? With Singapore’s recently enacted Unmanned Aircraft Act as the focal point, this article will compare and contrast the various regulations around the world to determine where the best balance has been struck between the freedom to create art and the purported competing demands of safety, privacy, and commercial interests.

Discipline

Air and Space Law | Asian Studies | Law and Society | Privacy Law

Research Areas

Law, Society and Governance

Publication

Singapore Law Review

Volume

33

Issue

1

First Page

1

Last Page

37

ISSN

0080-9691

Publisher

National University of Singapore Faculty of Law

City or Country

Singapore

Copyright Owner and License

Author

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

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