Publication Type

Journal Article

Version

Postprint

Publication Date

12-2015

Abstract

This article considers the extent to which the legal framework for making land use decisions in Singapore allows for public participation. It examines the issue from two angles: the creation and preservation of the built environment, and the transient use of public space. The first angle is discussed primarily from a heritage law viewpoint, focusing on planning law, compulsory acquisition law, and the legal regime for creating national monuments. As for the second angle, the article looks at how the use of common spaces for assemblies and processions is regulated. The foregoing are examined in the context of Edward Soja’s assertion in Seeking Spatial Justice (2010) that the equitable distribution of resources, services and access in cities is an important right.

Keywords

constitutional law, compulsory acquisition law, Edward Soja, heritage law, planning law, Singapore, spatial justice, transient use of public spaces

Discipline

Asian Studies | Land Use Law | Urban Studies and Planning

Research Areas

Law, Society and Governance

Publication

Asian Journal of Comparative Law

Volume

10

Issue

2

First Page

213

Last Page

234

ISSN

1932-0205

Identifier

10.1017/asjcl.2015.15

Publisher

Cambridge University Press

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Additional URL

http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/asjcl.2015.15

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