Title

State Immunity and Breaches of Human Rights

Publication Type

Book Chapter

Publication Date

2013

Abstract

Phillip Jessup included both public international law and private international law in his definition of transnational law. Jessup thought that transnational law includes “all law which regulates actions or events that transcend national frontiers.”1 Within this umbrella definition of transnational law, one can discern an intertwining of public and private law norms and the blurring of the distinctions between public international law and private international law. This chapter considers an area which brings into sharp relief the interplay between these two areas of law. The focus is on the situation where victims of breaches of fundamental human rights pursue civil claims against the foreign perpetrator states before national courts. The claim would be a private international law claim, usually one sounding in tort. However, in adjudging such a claim, the national court will have to consider public international law principles, most notably, the doctrine of state immunity.

Discipline

Human Rights Law

Research Areas

Law, Society and Governance

Publication

Regulatory Hybridization in the Transnational Sphere

Editor

Paulius Jurcys, Poul F. Kjaer & Ren Yatsunami

First Page

223

Last Page

242

ISBN

9789004233935

Publisher

Martinus Nijhoff

City or Country

Leiden

Additional URL

https://worldcat.org/isbn/9789004233935