Publication Type

Journal Article

Version

Publisher’s Version

Publication Date

4-2014

Abstract

In the early 20th century, the Japanese colonial government initiated an island-wide malaria eradication campaign in Taiwan, resulting in not only a rapid decline in malaria across time but also elimination of disparity across regions. Exploiting variations in malaria deaths caused by the campaign, we estimate causal effects of malaria exposure around birth on the health of elderly born in the colonial period. To mitigate potential biases caused by measurement errors and omitted confounders, we employ climatic factors to instrument for malaria deaths. Our findings suggest that people who were exposed to a high malaria risk around birth tend to have a higher likelihood of cardiovascular diseases and worse cognitive functions at old age.

Keywords

Malaria, Barker Hypothesis, health, Taiwan

Discipline

Asian Studies | Health Economics

Research Areas

Applied Microeconomics

Publication

Economic Development and Cultural Change

Volume

62

Issue

3

First Page

519

Last Page

536

ISSN

0013-0079

Identifier

10.1086/675434

Publisher

University of Chicago

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Additional URL

http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/675434

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