Publication Type

Journal Article

Publication Date

7-2008

Abstract

In recent years we have seen the emergence of a "new securocracy," a generalization of responsibility for fighting terror within the public sector. Here we consider the nature and extent of this securocratic shift. In particular, the identity implications for the public sector worker are explored and we contend that there is an inherent tension between "serving" and "policing" the public in many public sector jobs. We also discuss the way in which a securocratic identity is simultaneously embraced and resisted. Finally, we present some tentative insights into an alternative way of thinking about identity work, which offers a means of extending conventional interpretations.

Keywords

Public sector workers, Identity, Securocracy

Discipline

Business | Defense and Security Studies

Research Areas

Strategy and Organisation

Publication

International Journal of Public Administration

Volume

31

Issue

9

First Page

1024

Last Page

1036

ISSN

0190-0692

Identifier

10.1080/01900690801924033

Publisher

Taylor & Francis (Routledge): SSH Titles

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Additional URL

https://doi.org/10.1080/01900690801924033

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