Publication Type

Journal Article

Publication Date

12-2004

Abstract

Despite the rising popularity of the practice of competency modeling, research on competency modeling has lagged behind. This study begins to close this practice-science gap through 3 studies (1 lab study and 2 field studies), which employ generalizability analysis to shed light on (a) the quality of inferences made in competency modeling and (b) the effects of incorporating elements of traditional job analysis into competency modeling to raise the quality of competency inferences. Study 1 showed that competency modeling resulted in poor interrater reliability and poor between-job discriminant validity amongst inexperienced raters. In contrast, Study 2 suggested that the quality of competency inferences was higher among a variety of job experts in a real organization. Finally, Study 3 showed that blending competency modeling efforts and task-related information increased both interrater reliability among SMEs and their ability to discriminate among jobs. In general, this set of results highlights that the inferences made in competency modeling should not be taken for granted, and that practitioners can improve competency modeling efforts by incorporating some of the methodological rigor inherent in job analysis.

Discipline

Organizational Behavior and Theory | Social and Behavioral Sciences

Research Areas

Organisational Behaviour and Human Resources

Publication

Personnel Psychology

Volume

57

Issue

4

First Page

881

Last Page

904

ISSN

0031-5826

Publisher

Wiley: 24 months

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

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