Publication Type

Journal Article

Publication Date

7-2015

Abstract

Using a national sample of 620 Internet users in the US, this study examined the extent to which social projection, communication exposure, and an interaction between the two, influenced individuals’ perceptions about two subordinate types of social norms surrounding digital piracy: injunctive norms and descriptive norms. In line with the social projection model, individuals made social estimates about others’ piracy attitudes and behaviors anchoring on their own personal attitudes and behavior. However, frequent communication exposure reduced the degree to which they relied on this egocentric thought process. In addition, the two-way interaction was contingent on another condition (perceiver’s own piracy behavior) indicating that communication exposure had differing implications for pirates and non-pirates. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

Keywords

Digital piracy; Illegal downloading; Descriptive norms; Injunctive norms; Social projection; Social norms perceptions

Discipline

Business and Corporate Communications | Communication Technology and New Media | Social Influence and Political Communication

Research Areas

Corporate Communication

Publication

Computers in Human Behavior

Volume

48

First Page

506

Last Page

515

ISSN

0747-5632

Identifier

10.1016/j.chb.2015.02.018

Publisher

Elsevier

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Additional URL

http://doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2015.02.018