Title

Cognitive control and socially desirable behavior: The role of interpersonal impact

Publication Type

Journal Article

Publication Date

11-2013

Abstract

The current research reconciles two contradicting sets of findings on the role of cognitive control in socially desirable behaviors. One set of findings suggests that people are tempted by self-serving impulses and have to rely on cognitive control overriding such impulses to act in socially desirable ways. Another set of findings suggests people are guided by other-regarding impulses and cognitive control is not necessary to motivate socially desirable behaviors. We theorize that the dominant impulse is to behave in a socially desirable manner when the interpersonal impact of an action is salient, and that the dominant impulse is to behave in a self-serving manner when the interpersonal impact of an action is not salient. Studies 1-3 found that impairing participants' cognitive control led to less socially desirable behavior when interpersonal impact was not salient, but more socially desirable behavior when interpersonal impact was salient. Study 4 demonstrates that behaving in a socially desirable manner causes cognitive control impairment when interpersonal impact is not salient. But, when interpersonal impact is salient, behaving in a self-serving manner impairs cognitive control. We discuss the implications of our findings for understanding and managing socially desirable behaviors.

Keywords

Socially desirable behavior, Cognitive control, Impulses, Cheating, Resource distributions

Discipline

Organizational Behavior and Theory

Research Areas

Organisational Behaviour and Human Resources

Publication

Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes

Volume

122

Issue

2

First Page

232

Last Page

243

ISSN

0749-5978

Identifier

10.1016/j.obhdp.2013.08.003

Publisher

Elsevier

Additional URL

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.obhdp.2013.08.003

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