Publication Type

Journal Article

Publication Date

3-2016

Abstract

Based on attribution theory, this study examines how corporate social responsibility (CSR) and media coverage of corporate reputation, crisis, and CSR history affect the attribution of corporate hypocrisy and subsequently shape attitudes toward a company. The study found that perceptions of corporate hypocrisy mediated corporate reputation and attitudes toward a company during a crisis. The study suggested that CSR might be utilized best when a company has a good reputation with no crisis, whereas corporate hypocrisy is perceived most when a bad reputation and/or a company crisis lead the public to infer ulterior motives in CSR. Theoretical and practical implications for corporate communication and effective CSR communication strategies are discussed.

Keywords

corporate hypocrisy, corporate social responsibility, corporate citizenship, corporate reputation, corporate crisis, CSR history, CSR motives

Discipline

Business and Corporate Communications | Business Law, Public Responsibility, and Ethics

Research Areas

Corporate Communication

Publication

Public Relations Review

Volume

42

Issue

1

First Page

68

Last Page

78

ISSN

0363-8111

Identifier

10.1016/j.pubrev.2015.11.009

Publisher

Elsevier

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Additional URL

http://doi.org/10.1016/j.pubrev.2015.11.009