Publication Type

Editorial

Publication Date

2-2016

Abstract

Organizations, whether private or public, are subject to evaluations by their stakeholder community and society. These social evaluations form the basis of perceptions targeted at the organization, and influence the organization’s interactions with its stakeholders. “Reputation,” defined as beliefs or perceptions held about the quality of a focal actor, and “status,” defined as relative professional position or social standing, are both forms of social evaluation. Following works by Fombrun and Shanley (1990) and Merton (1968), reputation and status as theoretical constructs have become popularized in the literature, and management scholars have provided empirical evidence to provide a more complete view of their influence. In this thematic issue,1 we review trends in empirical research on reputation and status published in Academy of Management Journal (AMJ), and highlight the current issues being tackled by this stream of enquiry.

Keywords

Social evaluations, reputation, status, organizations

Discipline

Business | Organizational Behavior and Theory | Strategic Management Policy

Research Areas

Strategy and Organisation

Publication

Academy of Management Journal

Volume

59

Issue

1

First Page

1

Last Page

13

ISSN

0001-4273

Identifier

10.5465/amj.2016.4001

Publisher

Academy of Management

Additional URL

http://dx.doi.org/10.5465/amj.2016.4001

Share

COinS