Publication Type

Journal Article

Publication Date

3-2015

Abstract

We draw from theories of motivated reasoning, dual-processing models, and attribution of responsibility to examine how scientific messages may increase public polarization with respect to emerging risk issues such as Lyme disease. A nationally representative sample of Americans (N = 460) read messages about Lyme disease that varied the framing of responsibility for the prevalence of the disease (human/wildlife vs. wildlife only) and when its effects will occur (today vs. in the next 10 years). The influence of framing was contingent on participants’ partisanship, which resulted in a boomerang effect among Republicans and increased the degree of political polarization regarding support for proenvironmental behaviors.

Keywords

framing, motivated reasoning, temporal distance, dual-processing, One Health

Discipline

Business and Corporate Communications | Health Policy | Social Influence and Political Communication

Research Areas

Corporate Communication

Publication

Science Communication

Volume

37

Issue

3

First Page

340

Last Page

370

ISSN

1075-5470

Identifier

10.1177/1075547015575181

Publisher

SAGE Publications (UK and US)

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Additional URL

http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1075547015575181