Publication Type

Journal Article

Version

Publisher’s Version

Publication Date

1-2016

Abstract

Despite public programs to promote healthy eating among populations in developed and developing countries, the increase in obesity as a result of poor dietary patterns continues to persist. As food advertising has been implicated for contributing to this global health challenge, this study aims to provide empirical evidence on food advertising in a broader global context, across economically and culturally different nations. We conducted a large scale content analysis of the types of food advertised on primetime television in the United States, China, and Singapore, which resulted in the collection of 1,008 television hours. Using the dietary blue2376s proposed by the health authorities as the applied framework, the study compared the types of food advertised against the dietary parameters. Findings showed that despite differences in economic development and cultures, food advertised on primetime television across three countries are incongruent with dietary recommendations. The study offers insights on how misaligned and out of sync food advertising and commercial interests are from government health policies. Implications of findings to encourage healthy eating among populations worldwide are discussed.

Discipline

Advertising and Promotion Management | Asian Studies | Business and Corporate Communications | Public Health

Research Areas

Corporate Communication

Publication

Global Health Communication

Volume

2

Issue

1

First Page

30

Last Page

38

ISSN

2376-2004

Identifier

10.1080/23762004.2017.1278991

Publisher

Taylor and Francis

Copyright Owner and License

Authors

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Additional URL

http://doi.org/10.1080/23762004.2017.1278991