Publication Type

Journal Article

Version

Postprint

Publication Date

12-2004

Abstract

Procedural priming refers to how the frequent or recent use of certain cognitive procedures on one task can lead to a greater propensity to use the same procedures on a subsequent task. In this paper, we demonstrate how procedural priming may be used to assess spontaneous inference formation in situations where the inference involves a relationship or rule. We do so in the context of the advertising cost–product quality rule, i.e., that higher advertising expense implies higher product quality. Prior research suggests that underlying the advertising cost–quality rule is a basic human attribution (the effort investment rule) that says, if someone invests a lot of effort in a cause, it implies a true belief in that cause. We prime the effort investment rule in an interpersonal context and show that this affects spontaneous generation of the advertising cost–quality rule in an advertising context.

Keywords

Consumer psychology, Advertising

Discipline

Marketing | Organizational Behavior and Theory | Sales and Merchandising

Research Areas

Marketing

Publication

Journal of Economic Psychology

Volume

25

Issue

6

First Page

859

Last Page

875

ISSN

0167-4870

Identifier

10.1016/j.joep.2003.09.003

Publisher

Elsevier

Additional URL

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.joep.2003.09.003

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