Publication Type

Working Paper

Publication Date

9-2004

Abstract

Behavioral finance and classical finance based on utility maximization appear to be mutually exclusive schools of thought. Despite the fundamental difference, we show that behavioral finance also has a linear relation between risk and return. This relation is obtained without the assumptions of market equilibrium, rational expectations, a specific utility function and the market portfolio. In the behavioral approach, the pricing error of CAPM is not an error. It is attributable to the higher-order moments of return. Empirical tests suggest that the relative risk aversion coefficient is positive and time-varying. Moreover, it correlates negatively with both volatility and return.

Discipline

Finance and Financial Management | Portfolio and Security Analysis

Research Areas

Finance

Share

COinS